Adventures with gallery critique

A wonderful solution to an age old problem. Marking student work takes up so much of teacher time that it begins to be looked on with dread. The solution is to outsource it, but not the way you think.

Reflecting English

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In last weekend’s post, I argued that there might be more efficient and meaningful ways of providing feedback than standard book-marking. As such, I have been experimenting with ‘gallery critique’, an idea gleaned from Ron Berger’s An Ethic of Excellence and David Didau’s excellent post on the strategy.

In truth, I have always been dubious of the claims made of peer-assessment, especially in essentially qualitative subjects such as English. However well – or badly – I train students to critique one-another, two nagging doubts have never ceased to plague me. First, a student is always always dependent on the ability and commitment of the person they are paired with – some children will receive poorer feedback than others. Second, students naturally place more trust in teacher-feedback than peer-feedback – and why shouldn’t they? My hunch has always been that the process of both reading each other’s work and…

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Author: loremipsem

I am Head of Teaching and Learning and teach English at an independent School in Melbourne. I am passionate about using technology as a learning tool and I love reading and literature and language.

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