How to make marking more efficient: three new techniques for teachers

See on Scoop.itEdumathingy

English teacher Andrew Tharby shares his advice on how to significantly reduce the time spent marking while improving the quality of feedback for students

Louise Robinson-Lay‘s insight:

There has to be a better way of marking. English teachers in particular, seem to have to spend an inordinate amount of time marking student work. This post has some suggestions for making it not only easier, but more effective. We all know students need feedback but how often do you sit for hours for them only to look at a a mark and then put it down? Good feedback can avoid this and force students to take responsibility for their own progress. 

See on www.theguardian.com

Busting the learning myths – Telegraph

See on Scoop.itEdumathingy

Author and educationalist Daisy Christodoulou says long-term memory is the key to learning. Teacher Tom Payne agrees

Louise Robinson-Lay‘s insight:

There is time for chalk and talk. This article looks at the importance of teacher knowledge and their  recitation of facts and information to their students. Any good teacher knows that we have to tell them things. They cannot do it all by osmosis or inquiry. There is an important place for both the sage on the stage and the guide on the side.

See on www.telegraph.co.uk

Historical Figures’ Letterheads

See on Scoop.itEdumathingy

Letters have changed the world, from Churchill’s letters to Roosevelt during World War II to Martin Luther King’s letter from Birmingham jail. Here at MOO, we wondered how those letters would have looked today. To reimagine how iconic figures could have branded themselves in the modern world, our creative team have designed unique Letterheads and Business Cards for some of the most famous letter writers in history, capturing each identity in a set of stationery.

Louise Robinson-Lay‘s insight:

Historical figures ‘ business cards and letterheads as imagined by MOO.

See on www.flickr.com

Grammar matters and should be taught – differently

See on Scoop.itEdumathingy

I’m going to put it out there – most teachers don’t know enough about how the English language works [aka grammar], and this inevitably impacts upon student literacy outcomes. There are grammar pundits…

Louise Robinson-Lay‘s insight:

Hooray for getting rid of grammar workbooks that straight jacket kids’ language capacity and creativity. The author here is asserting that teachers need to teach grammar as part of literature and embedded in the everyday texts that they give students. She also Rgues for more explicit teaching and professional development of teachers who teach English. I wholeheartedly agree and do admit that my knowledge of how to teach grammar in text can improve too. 

See on theconversation.com

Teaching with Tech

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,163 other followers